Author: Tracey

Finding myself in Oldswinford, Stourbridge, recently, I took the opportunity of having a look around St Mary’s Church, which I know has connections with my Yeadon/Haden ancestors.   Luckily, I had already downloaded a copy of the Oldswinford parish registers and Monumental Inscriptions (MIs), published by the Birmingham & Midland Society for Genealogy and Heraldry (BMSGH) without which there is no way I would have found the Yeadon gravestone, above. Even with the details and the sketch map from the MIs…

Ancestry family tree

Receiving my AncestryDNA results prompted me to look again at family history research relating only to my direct ancestors. I had thought I was doing quite well – with one line going back ten generations to my 8x great-grandparents. However, because of the doubling of numbers at each generation, we all have mind-bogglingly large numbers of direct ancestors. Of my potential total of 2046 ancestors over ten generations, I know the names of only 119 of them, or just under six per cent. Twelve…

Ancestry DNA kit

Results from AncestryDNA indicate my ethnic origins are 100 per cent European (52% England & Wales, 19% Western Europe, 19% Ireland, 9% Scandinavia and less than 1% Italy/Greece). No real surprises, apart from the 19 per cent Irish, as my research so far (117 direct ancestors over 11 generations) hasn’t brought up anyone born in Ireland, nor indeed anyone born outside England. I haven’t yet found the Welsh ancestry I was promised, although my Williams and Jones lines are back…

A blog post by Wolverhampton Archives made me realise that I had two men by the name of Joseph FERN in my family tree who were both killed in the First World War. The two men were second cousins – their grandfathers were brothers. Joseph Fern (1887-1915) The first of the cousins to be killed was my great-great uncle (my great-grandfather’s brother). Joseph was the sixth of the seven sons (out of ten children) of my 3x great-grandparents, Timothy Fern and his wife…

Image of names on war memorial

On an ancestral tourism visit to Stourport-on-Severn, I saw the town’s war memorial which included the name Sergt.  J. Baldwin.   Suspecting that this was a distant relative of my 2x Great-grandmother, Sarah Baldwin, whose father was a boat builder and grocer in the town, I investigated further. I found it was her nephew, James Baldwin, born in 1881 and the son of her brother, Thomas. James was my first cousin, three times removed (in other words, his grandparents were my 3x…

Image of High Street, Swindon

The family of Isaac and Sarah Williams (nee Baldwin) moved to Swindon, Staffordshire between 1869 and 1871, moving from Lower Mitton (Stourport) in Worcestershire to Wolverhampton between 1861 and 1863 and then to Swindon, a small village in Staffordshire, near to Dudley. It is assumed that they moved for reasons of work. Isaac was an iron worker and the company that he is believed to have worked for, E. P. & W. Baldwin, had works in Wilden, Worcestershire as well…